Setup for our show Friday night at The Sparrow in North Charleston, SC, with Youth Model and Tim LeVan Miller.  Starts at 10. Setup for our show Friday night at The Sparrow in North Charleston, SC, with Youth Model and Tim LeVan Miller.  Starts at 10.

Setup for our show Friday night at The Sparrow in North Charleston, SC, with Youth Model and Tim LeVan Miller. Starts at 10.

mikemewborne:

I don’t know what you think you’re doing right now (5:24PM EDT) but my friend Nick Jenkins is playing songs on 90.5 FM Columbia and I’m loving the beauty and chaos.  You should listen.  Like, now.  Wherever you are.  Stream it.  

Don’t feel so afraid anymore.

humanoidhistory:

Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977, directed by Steven Spielberg
humanoidhistory:

Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977, directed by Steven Spielberg
humanoidhistory:

Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977, directed by Steven Spielberg

humanoidhistory:

Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977, directed by Steven Spielberg

(via mikemewborne)

jtotheizzoe:

thesciencestudio:

And here we have Lily Bui’s last pick. What if the solar system was a musical instrument? Find out here. (This does have auto-playing audio, just as an FYI friends). 

This SolarBeat planetary music generator from White Vinyl design is super-peaceful to listen to, I’ve had it on in the background for like 15 minutes. Just think, every sonic moment in that orbital simulation is a real moment that has or could happen in our little corner of the universe.

That being said, it does seem like a slightly-more-polished clone of Daniel Starr-Tambor’s Mandala project (which I featured on OKTBS ages ago), a planetary musical palindrome consisting of 62 vigintillion notes, likely the largest palindrome in the known universe.

Watch/listen to Mandala below:

Duh

humanoidhistory:

The magnificent planet Saturn, observed by the Cassini space probe on May 4, 2014. (NASA)

Saturn

humanoidhistory:

Behold Comet Jacques, flanked by IC 1805 and IC 1848, also known as Cassiopeia’s Heart and Soul Nebulae. Image by Dominique Dierick.

(NASA)

electricspacekoolaid:

Ancient Egyptians Used Meteorites For Jewelry

Open University (OU) and University of Manchester researchers wrote in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science that they found proof that ancient Egyptians used meteorites to make accessories.
In 1911, archaeologists dug up strings of iron beads at the Gerzeh cemetery, about 43 miles south of Cairo. The Gerzeh bead is the earliest discovered use of iron by the Egyptians, dating back from 3350 to 3600 BC. The bead was originally thought to be from a meteorite based on its composition of nickel-rich iron, but scientists challenged this theory back in the 1980s. However, the latest research places this theory back on top.
The scientists used a combination of electron microscope and X-ray CT scanner analyses to demonstrate that the nickel-rich chemical composition of the bead confirms its meteorite origins.
Philip Withers, a professor of materials science at University of Manchester, said meteorites have a unique microstructural and chemical fingerprint because they cooled incredibly slowly as they traveled through space. He said it was interesting to find that fingerprint in the Gerzeh bead.
“This research highlights the application of modern technology to ancient materials not only to understand meteorites better but also to help us understand what ancient cultures considered these materials to be and the importance they placed upon them,” said Open University Project Officer Diane Johnson, who led the study.

 -Read More -


Les anciens electricspacekoolaid:

Ancient Egyptians Used Meteorites For Jewelry

Open University (OU) and University of Manchester researchers wrote in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science that they found proof that ancient Egyptians used meteorites to make accessories.
In 1911, archaeologists dug up strings of iron beads at the Gerzeh cemetery, about 43 miles south of Cairo. The Gerzeh bead is the earliest discovered use of iron by the Egyptians, dating back from 3350 to 3600 BC. The bead was originally thought to be from a meteorite based on its composition of nickel-rich iron, but scientists challenged this theory back in the 1980s. However, the latest research places this theory back on top.
The scientists used a combination of electron microscope and X-ray CT scanner analyses to demonstrate that the nickel-rich chemical composition of the bead confirms its meteorite origins.
Philip Withers, a professor of materials science at University of Manchester, said meteorites have a unique microstructural and chemical fingerprint because they cooled incredibly slowly as they traveled through space. He said it was interesting to find that fingerprint in the Gerzeh bead.
“This research highlights the application of modern technology to ancient materials not only to understand meteorites better but also to help us understand what ancient cultures considered these materials to be and the importance they placed upon them,” said Open University Project Officer Diane Johnson, who led the study.

 -Read More -


Les anciens electricspacekoolaid:

Ancient Egyptians Used Meteorites For Jewelry

Open University (OU) and University of Manchester researchers wrote in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science that they found proof that ancient Egyptians used meteorites to make accessories.
In 1911, archaeologists dug up strings of iron beads at the Gerzeh cemetery, about 43 miles south of Cairo. The Gerzeh bead is the earliest discovered use of iron by the Egyptians, dating back from 3350 to 3600 BC. The bead was originally thought to be from a meteorite based on its composition of nickel-rich iron, but scientists challenged this theory back in the 1980s. However, the latest research places this theory back on top.
The scientists used a combination of electron microscope and X-ray CT scanner analyses to demonstrate that the nickel-rich chemical composition of the bead confirms its meteorite origins.
Philip Withers, a professor of materials science at University of Manchester, said meteorites have a unique microstructural and chemical fingerprint because they cooled incredibly slowly as they traveled through space. He said it was interesting to find that fingerprint in the Gerzeh bead.
“This research highlights the application of modern technology to ancient materials not only to understand meteorites better but also to help us understand what ancient cultures considered these materials to be and the importance they placed upon them,” said Open University Project Officer Diane Johnson, who led the study.

 -Read More -


Les anciens

electricspacekoolaid:

Ancient Egyptians Used Meteorites For Jewelry

Open University (OU) and University of Manchester researchers wrote in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science that they found proof that ancient Egyptians used meteorites to make accessories.

In 1911, archaeologists dug up strings of iron beads at the Gerzeh cemetery, about 43 miles south of Cairo. The Gerzeh bead is the earliest discovered use of iron by the Egyptians, dating back from 3350 to 3600 BC. The bead was originally thought to be from a meteorite based on its composition of nickel-rich iron, but scientists challenged this theory back in the 1980s. However, the latest research places this theory back on top.

The scientists used a combination of electron microscope and X-ray CT scanner analyses to demonstrate that the nickel-rich chemical composition of the bead confirms its meteorite origins.

Philip Withers, a professor of materials science at University of Manchester, said meteorites have a unique microstructural and chemical fingerprint because they cooled incredibly slowly as they traveled through space. He said it was interesting to find that fingerprint in the Gerzeh bead.

“This research highlights the application of modern technology to ancient materials not only to understand meteorites better but also to help us understand what ancient cultures considered these materials to be and the importance they placed upon them,” said Open University Project Officer Diane Johnson, who led the study.

 -Read More -

Les anciens

(via humanoidhistory)

Come see Gold Light in the Dark Room. And us. Tomorrow (tues.)

amnhnyc:

  • "Shooting stars" are actually meteors. People once thought they were stars falling from the sky. These tiny grains of dust glow brightly in Earth’s atmosphere because they’re traveling so fast that they release a tremendous amount of energy. 
  • Meteorites can be huge or tiny. The biggest one ever found weighs around 60 tons, while others are the size of a grain of sand. 
  • All meteorites come from inside our solar system. Most of them are fragments of asteroids that broke apart long ago in the asteroid belt, located between Mars and Jupiter. 
  • Small pieces of the Moon occasionally reach Earth as meteorites. We know where they come from because they’re identical in composition to the lunar rocks collected by Apollo astronauts. 
  • Certain “primitive” meteorites contain the first solid material to form in our solar system. Researchers have used the age of this material—4.568 billion years—to determine the age of our solar system.

Learn much more in the Arthur Ross Hall of Meteorites

More meteor facts… Just cuz

(via thenewenlightenmentage)